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‘Innovative Vibration Isolation Unit with Quasi-Zero Dynamic Stiffness’

Expected Results:

The project focuses on the development of systematic design and analysis methods combining quasi-zero-stiffness vibration isolation theory with bio-inspired design to create a novel isolation system.

The combination of bio-inspired structures and negative stiffness structures will produce extraordinary vibration isolation performance to prevent the vibrations transmitted to operator platforms and seats. The anticipated outcomes of the project will be:

  1. Systematic design methods and principles for developing innovative vibration isolation systems;
  2. A prototype of the innovative isolation unit; and
  3. Evaluation of the vibration isolation performance of the unit using extensive laboratory tests.

It is expected that the developed isolation system (unit), with appropriate modification for specific applications will be incorporated in the structure of the new equipment while also being adaptable to retrofit existing equipment.

Ref Number
20651
Associate Professor Jinchen Ji - University of Technology, Sydney
Start date
10 December 2018

Estimated end date
31 December 2019

‘Obesity and Coal Mining: Pilot Intervention’

Expected Results:

This research will provide valuable information for organisations about the challenges and benefits of introducing and implementing a healthy weight framework and initiative into the workplace.

This project has anticipated outcomes of a reduction in weight at the individual level, but importantly the project is about mine site ownership and engagement in the entire RESHAPE process. The process involves consultation with employees and selecting interventions that best-fit the workforce and site needs is necessary to ensure sustainability.

Attention must also be given to embedding this practice into health and safety organisation policy. There are also subsequent health benefits of a healthier workforce at the company level and overflow benefits to family and coal mining communities. The literature indicates a reduction in prevalence of overweight and obesity would lead to significant social and economic benefits for individuals, the community and the workplace.

Research results include dissemination of findings at a mine level, in academic peer reviewed journals and at appropriate industry relevant conferences.

Ref Number
20650
Associate Professor Carole James - University of Newcastle
Start date
07 December 2018

Estimated end date
31 December 2020

‘Characterising the biological effects of particulate matter exposures in coal mining to protect and improve the health of workers’

Expected Results:

At present, it is not clear how the existing standards for safe workplace exposure to coal dust have been generated, with the literature and the evidence upon which they are based pre-dating current mining practices. The advancement of coal technology, from the coalface to techniques of preparation, has not been replicated and/or complemented by a consistent development of supporting guidelines for safe exposures to PM along the handling and transportation chain.

It is unknown if Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) protocols appropriately incorporate the levels of exposure to different types of coal dust (e.g. fines and tailings). Coal dust type will differ (e.g. chemical elements and compounds) due to coal seam composition variation and mining method (e.g. long wall vs open-cut mining). Coal dust type will also have different levels of effects on respiratory health, depending on the dust constituent properties, concentration and duration of exposure.

We will address these important issues and define improved, evidence-based standards for safe exposure to different types of coal dust in Australian mining sites and transport and handling corridors. We will do this by characterising the biological and health effects of exposures to different types and levels of coal dust found in the workplace, from the mining source to the port and including all handling and transportation operations, with the goal of informing new regulations for re-defining risk, early identification of effects and safe PM exposures for coal and associated workers.

Ref Number
20649
Professor Phillip Hansbro, University of Newcastle
Start date
Estimated end date
31 December 2020

‘MATES in Mining’

Expected Results:

MATES in Construction has been well evaluated and been found to; have high social validity within the construction industry, improving knowledge around suicidality as well as promoting increased help seeking and help offering. The program has been associated with reduction in suicide rates in the Queensland construction industry against the state trend over the same period. This project will test the transferability of MATES in Construction to the mining industry as an ongoing industry based and run mental health and suicide prevention program. Program evaluation will focus on showing improved mental health, help seeking and help offering as well as improved mental health literacy amongst the workforce. The project will also seek to show reduced stigma around suicide and mental health issues generally across the industry.

Ref Number
20644
Jorgen Gullestrup, MATES
Start date
13 November 2017

Estimated end date
31 January 2020

‘Identifying areas and occupations in surface mining that are at high risk of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) exposure and using the findings to develop an evidence based health surveillance guideline for the Australian coal industry’

Expected Results:

To be able to quantify, through a targeted monitoring program, the levels of exposure to respirable dust and RCS that surface mineworkers could potentially be exposed to when conducting tasks already known to offer a higher risk profile. A very small percentage of annual statutory monitoring captures these activities and this targeted program will address this identified gap in our data and understanding. By partnering with CSH during this program, an enhanced and focused health surveillance system will result.

Ref Number
20642
Mark Shepherd, Coal Services CMTS
Start date
02 December 2016

Estimated end date
31 July 2018

‘Diesel-free environment for underground Coal Mines’

Expected Results:
  • Realisation of diesel-free vehicles for mining occupations. This will be a low speed battery powered vehicle that is explosion protected and designed for the important task of transporting both personnel and materials in underground coal mines.
  • A reference of pioneer vehicle that can be referred to establish other mining vehicles or mobile machines that range from low to high power requirements. Likewise, a standard evaluation procedures for all high energy density battery chemistries for applications in underground coal mining will be available.
  • A wireless charging technology that will be highly versatile in mining occupations since the evolution of electric-powered machinery in underground mines has become ever-increasing to meet the growing emissions, health and energy efficiency concerns.
Ref Number
20637
Khay See, University of Wollongong
Start date
22 September 2015

Estimated end date
31 July 2018